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March 2021

Monday, 29 March 2021 00:00

Why Does My Heel Hurt?

The heel is a fatty cushion on the back of the foot that provides padding. Obesity, improperly fitting shoes, injuries and running and jumping on hard surfaces can all lead to heel pain issues. One of the most common causes of heel pain is plantar fasciitis. Plantar fasciitis occurs when the plantar fascia, the band of tissue along the bottom of the foot that connects the heel to the toes, becomes inflamed. Plantar fasciitis is often associated with a heel spur as well. When the plantar fascia tears near the heel, it can bleed and then calcify. These calcium deposits form heel spurs, which can only be detected through an X-ray. If you are struggling with heel pain, please consult with a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis and treatment.

Many people suffer from bouts of heel pain. For more information, contact the podiatrists of Foot & Ankle Specialists of Central Ohio . Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Causes of Heel Pain

Heel pain is often associated with plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a band of tissues that extends along the bottom of the foot. A rip or tear in this ligament can cause inflammation of the tissue.

Achilles tendonitis is another cause of heel pain. Inflammation of the Achilles tendon will cause pain from fractures and muscle tearing. Lack of flexibility is also another symptom.

Heel spurs are another cause of pain. When the tissues of the plantar fascia undergo a great deal of stress, it can lead to ligament separation from the heel bone, causing heel spurs.

Why Might Heel Pain Occur?

  • Wearing ill-fitting shoes                  
  • Wearing non-supportive shoes
  • Weight change           
  • Excessive running

Treatments

Heel pain should be treated as soon as possible for immediate results. Keeping your feet in a stress-free environment will help. If you suffer from Achilles tendonitis or plantar fasciitis, applying ice will reduce the swelling. Stretching before an exercise like running will help the muscles. Using all these tips will help make heel pain a condition of the past.

If you have any questions please contact our offices located in Gahanna, Newark, Columbus, Pataskala, and Sunbury, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 22 March 2021 00:00

How Podiatrists Treat Broken Ankles

The ankle is the joint where the tibia (shin bone), the fibia (back bone on the lower leg), and the tallus (which connects to the heel bone) all come together.  A broken bone in this area can range from a hairline fracture to a shattering of the bone, and the symptoms may vary depending on the type of break.  Common symptoms are pain, swelling, and the inability to put weight on the ankle.  Because broken ankles are very serious and can be easily mistaken for an ankle sprain, patients who are experiencing severe ankle pain should visit a podiatrist.  A podiatrist will examine the ankle and use diagnostic imaging to determine what bones may be out of place.  Severe fractures will usually require a cast or brace in order to allow the ankle to heel.  However, some severe breaks with bones out of alignment will require surgery.  After the initial treatment, your podiatrist will be able to guide you in your recovery.

Broken ankles need immediate treatment. If you are seeking treatment, contact the podiatrists from Foot & Ankle Specialists of Central Ohio . Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet. 

Broken Ankles
A broken ankle is experienced when a person fractures their tibia or fibula in the lower leg and ankle area. Both of these bones are attached at the bottom of the leg and combine to form what we know to be our ankle.

When a physician is referring to a break of the ankle, he or she is usually referring to a break in the area where the tibia and fibula are joined to create our ankle joint. Ankles are more prone to fractures because the ankle is an area that suffers a lot of pressure and stress. There are some obvious signs when a person experiences a fractured ankle, and the following symptoms may be present.

Symptoms of a Fractured Ankle

  • Excessive pain when the area is touched or when any pressure is placed on the ankle
  •  Swelling around the area
  •  Bruising of the area
  • Area appears to be deformed

If you suspect an ankle fracture, it is recommended to seek treatment as soon as possible. The sooner you have your podiatrist diagnose the fracture, the quicker you’ll be on the way towards recovery.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Gahanna, Newark, Columbus, Pataskala, and Sunbury, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Wednesday, 17 March 2021 00:00

Plantar Warts Can Be Treated!

Plantar warts are small growths that develop on parts of the feet that bear weight. They're typically found on the bottom of the foot. Don't live with plantar warts, and call us today!

Monday, 15 March 2021 00:00

Do I Have Morton's Neuroma?

Morton’s neuroma is a painful foot condition caused by damage to the nerve between the third and fourth toes. The tissue that surrounds the nerve thickens due to inflammation, causing symptoms such as toe numbness, a tingling sensation, a feeling akin to “walking on a pebble,” and burning pain in the ball of the foot. Morton’s neuroma is eight to ten times more common in women than in men because it is believed to be caused by wearing ill-fitting shoes.  Morton's neuroma can also result from damaging the foot during high impact sports or from other trauma to the nerves of the feet. Having certain foot deformities, such as flat feet, high arches, hammertoes, or bunions, can also put you at an increased risk of developing Morton’s neuroma. If you have symptoms of this condition, please seek the care of a podiatrist.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact the podiatrists of Foot & Ankle Specialists of Central Ohio . Our doctors will attend to all of your foot care needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Gahanna, Newark, Columbus, Pataskala, and Sunbury, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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The large tendon on the back of the ankle connecting the calf muscle and the heel bone is known as the Achilles tendon. When this tendon tears, an Achilles tendon rupture may occur. A rupture is often common in sporting activities that involve pushing off the feet and sprinting, such as basketball and tennis. While Achilles tendon ruptures tend to happen more to males and people between the ages of 30 and 40, they can happen to anyone. Those who have poor flexibility, an inactive lifestyle, or are taking steroid medications may be at a higher risk for an Achilles tendon rupture as well. Signs of a rupture can include abrupt pain in the affected area, the feeling of getting kicked in the back of the leg, hearing a “pop” in back of the leg, weakness, and bruising or swelling in the area. If you believe that you have ruptured your Achilles tendon, or you would like to learn more about preventing a rupture, please consult with a podiatrist.

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact the podiatrists of Foot & Ankle Specialists of Central Ohio . Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the Symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Gahanna, Newark, Columbus, Pataskala, and Sunbury, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 01 March 2021 00:00

What Is a High Ankle Sprain?

A high ankle sprain, also known as a syndesmosis injury, can occur when the ankle is forcefully twisted upwards and away from your body during physical activity. This can happen while playing contact sports. For example, if somebody falls onto the outside of your ankle, it may force the ankle to move beyond its normal range, resulting in a high ankle sprain. A high ankle sprain differs from the more common lateral ankle sprain by its symptoms. While a lateral ankle sprain is painful, the pain from a high ankle sprain is usually more severe. It may be extremely difficult to bear weight on the ankle. However, high ankle sprains generally don’t bruise or swell as much as lateral ankle sprains. If you sustain any type of ankle sprain, it is suggested that you see a podiatrist for treatment.

Although ankle sprains are common, they aren’t always minor injuries. If you need your ankle injury looked at, contact the podiatrists from Foot & Ankle Specialists of Central Ohio . Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

How Does an Ankle Sprain Occur?

Ankle sprains are the result of a tear in the ligaments within the ankle. These injuries may happen when you make a rapid shifting movement while your foot is planted. A less common way to sprain your ankle is when your ankle rolls inward while your foot turns outward.

What Are the Symptoms?

  • Pain at the sight of the tear
  • Bruising/Swelling
  • Ankle area is tender to touch
  • In severe cases, may hear/feel something tear
  • Skin discoloration

Preventing a Sprain

  • Wearing appropriate shoes for the occasion
  • Stretching before exercises and sports
  • Knowing your limits

Treatment of a Sprain

In many cases, the RICE method (Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevate) is used to treat ankle sprains. However, you should see a podiatrist to see which treatment option would work best with your injury. In severe cases, surgery may be required.

It is important to ask your doctor about rehab options after you receive treatment for your injury. Stretching, strength training, and balance exercises may help the ankle heal while also preventing further injury.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Gahanna, Newark, Columbus, Pataskala, and Sunbury, OH . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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