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Monday, 17 February 2020 00:00

There are several reasons why the condition, known as cracked heels, may develop. These can include wearing shoes that have an open back, living in a dry environment, and standing for extended periods of time throughout the day. Common symptoms of this ailment can include dry skin on the heel and surrounding areas, and in severe cases, the skin may split open which is referred to as fissures. Mild relief may be found when the feet are washed in warm water, followed by using a good ointment. This may be effective in replenishing moisture that is necessary in maintaining soft skin. If you would like more information about the causes and treatment of cracked heels, please consult with a podiatrist.

Cracked heels are unsightly and can cause further damage to your shoes and feet. If you have any concerns, contact the podiatrists from Foot & Ankle Specialists of Central Ohio . Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Cracked Heels

Cracked heels appear unappealing and can make it harder for you walk around in sandals. Aside from looking unpleasant, cracked heels can also tear stockings, socks, and wear out your shoes. There are several methods to help restore a cracked heel and prevent further damage.

How Do You Get Them?

Dry skin is the number one culprit in creating cracked heels. Many athletes, walkers, joggers, and even swimmers suffer from cracked heels. Age and skin oil production play a role to getting cracked heels as well.

Promote Healing

Over the counter medicines can help, especially for those that need instant relief or who suffer from chronic dry feet.

Wear Socks – Wearing socks with medicated creams helps lock in moisture.

Moisturizers – Applying both day and night will help alleviate dryness which causes cracking.

Pumice Stones – These exfoliate and remove dead skin, which allows for smoother moisturizer application and better absorption into the skin. 

Change in Diet

Eating healthy with a well-balanced diet will give the skin a fresh and radiant look. Your body responds to the kinds of food you ingest. Omega-3 fatty acids and zinc supplements can also revitalize skin tissue.

Most importantly, seek professional help if unsure how to proceed in treating cracked heels. A podiatrist will help you with any questions or information needed. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Gahanna, Newark, Columbus, Pataskala, and Sunbury, OH. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 10 February 2020 00:00

Many diabetic patients are aware of the importance of promptly treating existing foot wounds. There may be serious complications if foot wounds are not treated, which may cause pain and discomfort. Some of the wounds on the feet that can be dangerous to the health of a diabetic patient can include cuts, blisters, or severely dry skin that may result in cracked heels. There are noticeable signs an infection may have developed. These can consist of extreme pain, swelling, and pus may appear surrounding the affected area. Additionally, some patients may experience a high temperature, swollen glands, or a general feeling of being unwell. If you have wounds on your feet, it is strongly advised that you are under the care of a podiatrist who can treat existing wounds.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with the podiatrists from Foot & Ankle Specialists of Central Ohio . Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Gahanna, Newark, Columbus, Pataskala, and Sunbury, OH. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 03 February 2020 00:00

As many patients know, having an ingrown toenail can be extremely painful, and can often make completing everyday activities more difficult. To help prevent developing this uncomfortable condition, it’s important that certain precautions are taken while cutting your toenails. The first step for proper trimming starts with your technique. Nails should be trimmed straight across, avoiding making them rounded. They should also be trimmed just enough that the corners loosely sit on the skin, and not too short where they begin to dig into the skin. You also want to make sure that the clippers you’re using to trim your nails are specifically designed for the purpose of trimming toenails. Some signs that may indicate you’ve developed an ingrown toenail can include redness surrounding the skin of the affected toe, swelling, pain, and in more severe cases, you may notice pus around the nail. In order to safely treat an ingrown toenail, we recommend you consult with a podiatrist for professional care and attention.

Ingrown toenails can become painful if they are not treated properly. For more information about ingrown toenails, contact the podiatrists of Foot & Ankle Specialists of Central Ohio . Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails occur when a toenail grows sideways into the bed of the nail, causing pain, swelling, and possibly infection.

Causes

  • Bacterial infections
  • Improper nail cutting such as cutting it too short or not straight across
  • Trauma to the toe, such as stubbing, which causes the nail to grow back irregularly
  • Ill-fitting shoes that bunch the toes too close together
  • Genetic predisposition

Prevention

Because ingrown toenails are not something found outside of shoe-wearing cultures, going barefoot as often as possible will decrease the likeliness of developing ingrown toenails. Wearing proper fitting shoes and using proper cutting techniques will also help decrease your risk of developing ingrown toenails.

Treatment

Ingrown toenails are a very treatable foot condition. In minor cases, soaking the affected area in salt or antibacterial soaps will not only help with the ingrown nail itself, but also help prevent any infections from occurring. In more severe cases, surgery is an option. In either case, speaking to your podiatrist about this condition will help you get a better understanding of specific treatment options that are right for you.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Gahanna, Newark, Columbus, Pataskala, and Sunbury, OH. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 27 January 2020 00:00

Those with peripheral artery disease, or PAD for short, may experience chronic ischemia, better known as a lack of blood supply. When this occurs, you may experience a dull, cramping pain in the affected area, commonly the feet, when exercising. The pain often stops when resting. This kind of symptom is referred to as claudication. For a proper diagnosis, a podiatrist may suggest taking an ABI, or ankle brachial index. This exam consists of using ultrasound images that will measure the blood pressure in your feet. This type of test is common for diagnosing PAD, and is painless. PAD is likely to develop among adults over the age of 50, and is especially common for those with diabetes. For more information about peripheral artery disease, and to discuss a plan for treatment, we recommend you consult with a podiatrist for professional care.

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with the podiatrists from Foot & Ankle Specialists of Central Ohio . Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heel
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Gahanna, Newark, Columbus, Pataskala, and Sunbury, OH. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Peripheral Artery Disease
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